Unsteady Aerodynamics
Figure 1. 3D grid with dynamic roughness activated for CFD studies of the ability for dynamic roughness to alter the leading-edge vortex on a rapidly pitching airfoil.

Unsteady Aerodynamics

Status: Active and Funded

My research group and I are currently working on a funded research project dealing with the role of unsteady aerodynamics in the motion of unstable bodies. The primary mode of instability is static margin, causing high angular rates. These high angular rates are not accurately predicted by static aerodynamic analysis. The goal of the study is to provide better body motion prediction taking into account unsteady aerodynamic effects.

I also continue to study the use of dynamic roughness to alter dynamic stall behavior on rapidly pitching airfoils. Preliminary CFD and experimental wind tunnel data showed the ability for dynamic roughness to delay the onset of the leading-edge vortex. Current work involves more robust CFD simulations (LES), as well as the collection of experimental force and moment data.

Figure 2. 3D grid with dynamic roughness activated for CFD studies of the ability for dynamic roughness to alter the leading-edge vortex on a rapidly pitching airfoil.

Thermal and Fluid Flow Analysis

Status: Active and Funded

WVU is a partner with Boston Engineering Corporation working to improve the efficiency of diver body temperature regulation systems. My main role is to conduct CFD analysis on the fluid delivery system and its components. This analysis includes pressure drop calculations as well as heat transfer throughout the system.

Figure 3. 3D grid with dynamic roughness activated for CFD studies of the ability for dynamic roughness to alter the leading-edge vortex on a rapidly pitching airfoil.

Biomimetics

Status: Active, Soliciting Future Funding

My colleagues and I teamed with a biologist and a bird trainer to investigate the behavior of feathers on a flying bird. This included live bird flights in the WVU Free Flight Wind Tunnel and cadaver wing testing in the WVU Subsonic Closed-Loop Wind Tunnel. The live bird flights showed a repeatable activation of the covert feathers during the approach to the perch. The covert feather activation started at the leading edge of the wing then moved aft.

The cadaver wing studies recorded aerodynamic performance at static angles of attack. Feather frequency was also recorded. The performance was then compared to wings in which the feather motion was inhibited by different surface treatments.

A graduate researcher in the group has just finished conducting feather frequency analysis of a cadaver wing undergoing a rapid pitchup. It is hypothesized the unsteady aerodynamic effects cause higher feather activity, specifically the covert feather activity.

Figure 4. 3D grid with dynamic roughness activated for CFD studies of the ability for dynamic roughness to alter the leading-edge vortex on a rapidly pitching airfoil.

Unmanned Aerial Systems

Status: Active and Funded

The most recent finished study involved adding simple "deployable" wings to a conventional quad rotor to investigate the potential for energy savings during longer duration cruise flight. Free flights were conducted in the WVU Free Flight Wind Tunnel, as well as aerodyamaic loads and moments in the WVU Subsonic Closed-Loop Wind Tunnel.

Our research group currently has proposals out for extended range munitions and steerable munitions.

Unsteady Aerodynamics

Status: Active and Funded
Description:

My research group and I are currently working on a funded research project dealing with the role of unsteady aerodynamics in the motion of unstable bodies. The primary mode of instability is static margin, causing high angular rates. These high angular rates are not accurately predicted by static aerodynamic analysis. The goal of the study is to provide better body motion prediction taking into account unsteady aerodynamic effects.

I also continue to study the use of dynamic roughness to alter dynamic stall behavior on rapidly pitching airfoils. Preliminary CFD and experimental wind tunnel data showed the ability for dynamic roughness to delay the onset of the leading-edge vortex. Current work involves more robust CFD simulations (LES), as well as the collection of experimental force and moment data.

Thermal and Fluid Flow Analysis

Biomimetics

Status: Active, Soliciting Future Funding
Description:

My colleagues and I teamed with a biologist and a bird trainer to investigate the behavior of feathers on a flying bird. This included live bird flights in the WVU Free Flight Wind Tunnel and cadaver wing testing in the WVU Subsonic Closed-Loop Wind Tunnel. The live bird flights showed a repeatable activation of the covert feathers during the approach to the perch. The covert feather activation started at the leading edge of the wing then moved aft.

The cadaver wing studies recorded aerodynamic performance at static angles of attack. Feather frequency was also recorded. The performance was then compared to wings in which the feather motion was inhibited by different surface treatments.

A graduate researcher in the group has just finished conducting feather frequency analysis of a cadaver wing undergoing a rapid pitchup. It is hypothesized the unsteady aerodynamic effects cause higher feather activity, specifically the covert feather activity.

Unmanned Aerial Systems

Status: Active and Funded
Description:

The most recent finished study involved adding simple "deployable" wings to a conventional quad rotor to investigate the potential for energy savings during longer duration cruise flight. Free flights were conducted in the WVU Free Flight Wind Tunnel, as well as aerodyamaic loads and moments in the WVU Subsonic Closed-Loop Wind Tunnel.

Our research group currently has proposals out for extended range munitions and steerable munitions.